(20231022) Канада: ВЛ Манитоба: Новини

Новина 19 от 1280
(20231022) Канада: ВЛ Манитоба: Новини
Volume 19 | 2023

 

 
 

 

eNews

 

Visit our Website

 

 
 

 

 

 

That’s a good question ?

 

What does the Trowel Symbolize ??

.

The Trowel is an important symbol and working took in Craft Masonry in many parts of the world, although it has become obsolete in England and in those rituals based on English workings.

.

However, the Trowel was still being used in England in the 18th Century, when Masonry was being spread abroad, and, perhaps, as a result, American Lodges still use it as the only “Working Tool” in their Master Mason’s Degree.

.

An early English book, Preston’s Illustrations of Masonry dated 1792, says:

“The Trowel is mentioned as one of the things presented to the W.M. on his installation.”

.

But when the ritual was revived in 1813 the trowel appears to have been dropped from the English craft Masonry altogether and is now completely obsolete in the system.

.

However, in Scotland today (1966) the Trowel is used as the collar jewel of the Junior Deacon, and the Grand Junior Deacon also wears this jewel as part of his regalia.

.

They explain the use of the Trowel this way: “The Trowel teaches that nothing can be united without proper cement, and the perfection of the building depends on the suitable disposition of the cement. So Charity, the bond of perfection and social union, must unite separate minds and interests that, like the radii of a circle which extend from the centre to every part of the circumference, the principle of universal benevolence may be diffused to every member of the community.”

.

“As it is used by the operative Brother to spread cement which unites the building into one common mass, so the Freemason uses the Trowel emblematically for the noble and glorious purpose of spreading the cement of brotherly love and affection, that cement which unites the members of the fraternity into one sacred band or society of Brothers.

.

However, in the Scandinavian countries, all Masons in Craft Lodges wear the Trowel as a jewel. Entered Apprentices and Fellowcrafts wear a silver Trowel and Master Masons wear a gold Trowel.

.

These countries use two sets of Working Tools, both sets being explained in the First Degree. The first set consists of the square, level, and plumb rule. The second set consists of the Trowel, hammer and compasses. The Trowel is also well known in European Masonry.

.

In one French working, (if not more) the candidate in the Fellowcraft Degree is made to take five ‘voyages’ around the Lodge and on each ‘voyage’ carries a different Working Tool, namely the mallet and chisel, the square and compasses, the rule and crowbar, the level, and on the fifth and last ‘voyage’, the Trowel.

.

In U.S. Lodges, and, in those Canadian Lodges which have taken their ritual and form from the various American states, the Trowel is the only Working Tool used in the Third Degree.

.

To quote Mackey’s Encyclopedia: “This implement is considered the appropriate Working Tool of a Master Mason, because, in operative Masonry, while the Apprentice is engaged in preparing the rude materials, which require only the gauge and gavel to give them their proper shape, the Fellow Craft places them in their proper position by means of the plumb, level, and square; but the Master Mason alone, having examined their correctness and proved them true and trusty, secures them permanently in their place by spreading, with the Trowel, the cement that irrevocably binds them together.”

.

Robert Macoy, in his book, The Masonic Ritual, informs us that “the Trowel is an implement made use of by operative Masons to spread the cement which unites the building into one common mass; but we, as Free and Accepted Masons, are taught to make use of it for the more noble and glorious purpose of spreading the cement of brotherly love and affection; that cement which unites us into one sacred band, or society of friends and brothers, among whom no contention should ever exist, but that noble contention, or rather emulation, of who best can work, and best agree.”

.

This charge, as Macoy gives it, has remained relatively unchanged to this day, and is still used by most American and some Canadian Lodges.

.

The Trowel has been, and still is, a respected Working Tool in the Craft throughout much of the world and, even though we may not use it ourselves, it may still provide us with much symbolism on which to moralize.

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

Supporting Cancer Patients since 1983 – 40years and counting.

 

Click here to visit the Masonic Foundation of MB website

 

Charity is a large part of a Freemason’s life. It is one of the three basic guiding principles taught to Freemasons which are: Brotherly Love, Relief (Charity) and Truth. To the Freemason, Relief (Charity) in its widest sense is about relationships between people, how they treat each other, the need to respect one another and tolerance of the differences between people. Practical assistance such as giving money is also an important part of our charitable attitude, which is paramount, and it is this that Freemasons are taught in their Lodges.

.

Thanks to your generous contributions to the Foundation, we as Freemasons have touched the lives of thousands of people in the community. I hope I can count again on your support for our Foundation.

 .

In 2023-24, Manitoba Masons will continue this legacy of community support and philanthropy with support for our various charitable programs, i.e., the Mason’s Care Transportation Program (also known as Wheels of Hope), the Endowment Fund, Int. Peace Garden and other projects. The Freemasons of Manitoba are celebrating 40 continuous years of support for the Transportation Program and are committed to replacing the vehicles as required for this program.

 .

Total funds needed to be raised – $48,000

.

Your gift of $25, $50, $100, or more can make all the difference. You can even visit our website to donate or become a monthly donor. Monthly donations significantly help the Foundation with its funding obligations.

.

Please consider making as generous a gift as you can, as every donation truly helps. Help us achieve this goal as soon as possible by sending in your pledge today! A return envelope is enclosed for your convenience.  We also accept donations on-line through our partnership with CanadaHelps.org.

 .

Thank you for your generous support of the Masonic Foundation. Together we will make a difference!

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 
Stony Mountain Stonewall Masonic Lodge #12 is currently selling tickets for our “Event for the Year” Each ticket is entered into a weekly draw of $50. There are also 4 additional prizes throughout the year for $100.  Tickets are $40.00 each and only 200 tickets have been printed. Tickets are available from any member of the lodge and also by etransfer to lodge122011@gmail.com. Feel free to contact W.M Tim Heisler at heislet@hotmail.com or 204-430-1349 if you have any questions.

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

Grand Masters Itinerary

 

 
 

 

 

 

A Famous Freemason

 

Leroy Gordon “Gordo” Cooper, Jr. was an American astronaut born on March 6th, 1927 in Shawnee, Oklahoma. In his youth he was active in the Boy Scouts of America. He attended local Shawnee schools, Jefferson Elementary School and Shawnee High School. He graduated high school from Murray High School when his father was called back into military service in the middle of Cooper’s senior year. He attended two months at Murray High School, graduating in 1945.

.

After high school, Cooper looked into joining the military. When he discovered the Army and Navy flying schools were not taking any candidates, he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps as a reservist. He attempted to get on the list to go to the United States Naval Academy and was not able to get in.

.

After being released from active service with other reservists, Cooper moved to Hawaii where he attended the University of Hawaii. In 1949, he had his commission transferred to the United States Air Force and began active duty at Perrin Air Force base in Texas. He was then transferred in 1950 to an Air Base in West Germany. Over the next 6 years he attended three different Universities and receive a degree in Aerospace Engineering.

.

In 1956 Cooper was assigned to the USAF Experimental Flight Test School at Edwards Air Force base. After he graduated he was assigned to the Flight Test Engineering Division at Edwards.

While at Edwards, Cooper was intrigued by the announcement McDonnell Aircraft had been awarded a contract to build a space capsule.

.

Shortly after, Cooper was called to Washington, D.C. where he was tested with 109 other pilots to become one of the seven Mercury astronauts. Cooper was the youngest of the seven astronauts chosen. Cooper was assigned the last Mercury mission and was launched into space on May 15th, 1963. He orbited the earth 22 times and had more time in space than all of the other six Mercury astronauts combined. On his 19th orbit his capsule, Faith 7, lost power. Cooper was forced to fly the capsule manually. He had to calculate his trajectory for reentry and perform other complex math equations to ensure he properly entered the Earth’s atmosphere. His calculations put him very close to the aircraft carrier assigned to pick him up. Prior to this point in Cooper’s flight, the Mercury Astronauts were seen as merely passengers. Chuck Yeager referred to the seven Mercury astronauts as “Spam in a Can” due to their passenger status.

.

Cooper went up again as part of the Gemini program. He flew with Pete Conrad on Gemini 5. The two astronauts set a space endurance record remaining in orbit for more than 190 hours. Their flight set some of the ground work for the Apollo mission proving men could survive in space for a time equivalent to traveling from the Earth to the Moon and back.

.

Cooper was also a part of the Apollo program. He never got a chance to land on the moon. He retired from the Air Force in 1970. He went on to work in various jobs in the private sector. This included working for the Disney corporation as a Vice President of Research and Development for Epcot.

.

Cooper passed away on October 4th, 2004 from heart failure. At the time of his death he also suffered from Parkinson’s disease. Cooper was a member of Carbondale Lodge No. 82 in Carbondale, Colorado.

.

~ MasonryToday

 

 
 
 

 

 
 

 

As previously communicated to you, the Grand Lodge of Manitoba Education and Training Committee will hold a Fall education workshop on December 2nd, Saturday. This is the first of two (2) workshops planned for this Masonic Year.

Please note that we have made some adjustment to the start and content to give more time for the presentations and Q&A.

.

Registration will start at 8 AM. The workshop will start at 8:30 AM. We will then end the session and proceed to have a light lunch at 12:30 PM.

During lunch, RWB Richard Lacoursiere will present his 2020-2022 JRC Evans Lecture “Good Leaders Eat Last”.

The topics for this Fall workshop are:

1.   Leadership – RWB Bob Grant

a.   What is good leadership?

b.   Vs management

c.    Servant leadership

2.   Expectations of Lodge Officers – RWB Rey Galapon

a.   Lodge Officer Positions and Responsibilities – RWB Rey Galapon

b.   Importance of being versed in the Grand Lodges Constitution a Regulations – MWB Chibu Uson

c.    Importance of being versed in the Lodge Bylaws – RWB Jojo Lorenzo

3.   Lodge Education Officer: RW Bro Richard Lacoursiere / RWB Jon Romu

a.   Lodge Education program

b.   Ways to present Education

c.    Samples

d.   Open discussion

4.   Lunch – presentation of the 2022/2022 JRC Evans Lecture – RWB Richard Lacoursiere

 .

There will be a nominal attendance fee of $25 to cover the cost of the meal from WOW catering.

.

We encourage all the Lodges to cover the attendance fee as this workshop will also benefit the attendee’s Lodge. E-tansfer to rlorenzo@shaw.ca Once deposited your name will show as the depositor. Registration forms can also be sent to rlorenzo@shaw.ca.

.

As a committee, we would like to extend the invitation to all Freemasons, EA’s and up, young and old, New and Experienced to join us on Saturday morning, 2nd December. As your Education and Training Committee, we look forward to spending that time with you in the pursuit of Masonic Growth and Friendship. 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

Come join us to welcome Khartum to its new home on Dec. 2nd. Tickets are on sale. Call 204-925-1430 to purchase. This event is open to the entire Masonic Family and your friends. Only 200 tickets $20pp

 

 
 

 

www.blood.ca

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

Thought for the Day

.

“The mind once enlightened cannot again become dark.” – Thomas Paine

.

———–

.

Your present circumstances don’t determine where you can go; they merely determine where you start.

Start with determination, a positive attitude, and you can reach remarkable destinations..