(20221002) Канада: ВЛ Манитоба: Новини

Новина 85 от 1272
(20221002) Канада: ВЛ Манитоба: Новини
Volume 30 | 2022

 

 
 

 

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That’s a good question ?

 

WHO WAS HIRAM ABIFF ?
Hiram Abiff, we know, was a widow’s son. He was the son of a man of Tyre, but his mother was an Israelite, said in one record to have been of the tribe of Napthtal, and in another, of the “daughters of Dan.”

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His mother was indeed a native of the tribe of Dan, but her first husband was of the tribe of Napthtali, to whom Hiram was probably born. After the death of the first husband, she then married a man of Tyre, and her son was brought up as a Tyrian and fully educated and trained in the arts of that land. Tyre was one of the principal seats of the Dionysiac fraternity of artificers, a Society engaged exclusively in the construction of edifices and united in a secret organization, subsequently imitated by the Operative Masons of the Temple. Hiram Abiff was quite probably a member of this organization, and learned much from this privilege. In assuming his work at Jerusalem, he introduced among the workmen the same exact system of discipline that he had found so advantageous in the Dionysiac Secret Society. From this secret society of operative masons there was evolved the Order of Speculative Masons, of which Hiram Abiff was the first Grand Master.

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His mother, being a Daughter of Dan, the fifth son of Jacob, endowed Hiram with characteristics of this tribe. This tribe was said to be bold, courageous, daring and cunning. The banner of Dan was blue. This may bean origin for the choice of blue as a Masonic color.

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In Chronicles, Chapter 2, verses 13 & 14, Hiram King of Tyre tells Solomon about the man he has sent to oversee the work of the Temple:

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“And now I have sent a cunning man, endued with understanding, of Huram my father’s, the son of a woman of the daughters of Dan, and his father was a man of Tyre, skillful to work in gold, and in silver, in brass, in iron, in stone, and in timber, in purple, in blue, and in fine linen, and in crimson; also to grave any manner of graving, and to find out every device in which shall be put to him, with thy cunning men, and with the cunning men of my lord David thy father.”

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Obviously a good man to supervise the construction of a building containing all those materials and to manage all the workers.

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It appears that Napthtali was also the fifth son of Jacob. The Lord, in Deuteronomy 33:23, says “0 Napthtali, satisfied with favor, and full with the blessing of the Lord, Possess thou the west and the south.” In the same Chapter, the Lord refers to Dan as “a lion’s whelp.”

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All of this together, shows us that our character Hiram Abiff, is a wrapping of many Masonic symbols and characteristics. He inherits possession of the west and south, descended from the tribe that possessed the Lion of the Tribe of Judah (a symbolic reference to Christ) and possesses skills critical to the mastery of his craft. The mystery of who he is still remains, for while there are references to Hiram in his character as a craftsman, there is no Biblical reference to the name Abiff which is uniquely Masonic.

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By Bro. Jim Pullins, Pleasant Valley #531

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

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A Famous Freemason

 

Leslie Miscampbell Frost was a Canadian politician, born in Orilla, Ontario, Canada on September 20th, 1895. He attended the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall Law School. During World War I he served with the 157th Battalion “Simcoe Foresters”, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) and the 20th Battalion Queen’s York Rangers in Belgium and France. In 1918 he was wounded in battle and discharged as a captain.

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In 1921, Frost was called to the Bar. Frost and his brother lived in Lindsay, Ontario commuted daily to their law practice in Pleasant Point, Ontario by steamer up Sturgeon Lake.

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In 1937, Frost entered politics when he was elected to the Ontario legislature. After his initial win, he never lost an election. During his time in the legislature he was the Treasurer of Ontario and the Minister of Mines. Frost was chosen as the leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party and dubbed “Old Man Ontario” and “The Laird of Lindsay.” He became Premier of Ontario in 1949. He led the province as Premier during the economic boom of the 1950’s. His low key approach also earned him the nickname “The Great Tranquilizer.” He served as Premier of Ontario until 1961.

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During his time as Premier he saw the expansion of government in the province in healthcare, highways and schools. His government substantially increased the public investment in the economy. Under his leadership Ontario built the 400 series of highways. He also tried to take control of the income tax from the federal government. He failed to implement a sales tax in the province. In education the number of universities increased from 4 to 12. In 1943 the provinces investment in education was $13 million. By the time Frost retired as Premier, the province was spending $250 million on education.

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Frost was also active on the Civil Rights front in Ontario. His government was the first to pass laws providing penalties for racial, ethnic, and gender discrimination on private property under the Fair Employment Practices Act and Fair Accommodation Practices Act. The year after he left office, the civil rights movement he started in Ontario brought the Ontario Human Rights Code into existence. His government also introduced voting rights for First Nations, the indigenous people of Canada.

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Frost’s government also oversaw the federation of old City of Toronto with twelve surrounding municipalities to form Metropolitan Toronto.

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After Frost retired in 1961, he remained active with various activities including serving on the Board of Governors of the University of Toronto, as well as a member of the Board of Directors of the Bank of Montreal, Canada Life, and Trans Canada Air. He also served as Vice President of the Champlain Society, named after the explorer Samuel D. Champlain, the organization seeks to advance knowledge of Canadian history through the publication of scholarly books (both digital and print) of primary records of voyages, travels, correspondence, diaries and governmental documents and memoranda. He also worked to protect public lands and in his final interview declared himself an environmentalist.

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Frost was also a fan of United States history, particularly the American Civil War. On his mantle he had a piece of wood allegedly from President Abraham Lincoln’s childhood log cabin home.

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Bro. Frost was a member of Faithful Brethren Lodge No. 77 in Lindsay, Ontario, he passed to the Grand Lodge Above on May 4th, 1973. 

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Source: MasonryToday

 
 

 

 

 

 
 
GM MW Bro. Junn Manalang & some of brethren attending the Fall Bi-Annual meeting of the Union Historical Lodge No.108 located at the Manitoba Agricultural Museum in Austin, Manitoba on September 30th.

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

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Articles published in this newsletter are not necessarily the opinion of the Grand Lodge of Manitoba or any of its officers or members, but are solely those of the writer…

Freemasonry is the world’s oldest and largest fraternity. It is comprised of adult men (18+) of good character from every country, religion, race, age, income, education, and opinion. Its body of knowledge and system of ethics is based on the belief that each man has a responsibility to improve himself while being devoted to his family, his faith, his country, and his fraternity.

 

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