(20220306) Canada: GL Manitoba: News

Новина 93 от 1155
(20220306) Canada: GL Manitoba: News
Volume 07 | 2022

 

 
 

 

eNews

 

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That’s a good question ?

 

Is there Freemasonry in Ukraine ?
In view of the current situation, it is worth recalling the history and present of freemasonry in Ukraine.

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On a record the first lodge of Three Brothers was created in the village of Vyshnivka in Volhynia in 1742 by Polish noblemen. In Lviv the first lodge of Three Goddesses appeared in 1758 (part of Austro-Hungary).

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The first lodge in Malorossiya (Russian Empire) was established in Kiev in 1784 by Russian officers. One of the members of that lodge which was named Bessmertie was Hryhoriy Skovoroda. The lodge was created eventually after the first Partition of Poland. The next year 1784 three lodges have appeared in Kremenchuk: Mars, Dobry Pastyr, and Minerva. The last one Minerva was transferred to the Dnieper banks from the city of Podolie Nemyriv. It is known that freemasonry existed in Kharkiv, Vinnytsia, Yekaterinoslav, Berdichev, others. Later (1780-90s) couple lodges existed in each of the following cities DubnoKremenchukZhytomyr, and Kiev (Bessmertie and Tri kolonny). (Tri kolonny was recreated in 1993.) In the 19th century the popularity of them only increased throughout Ukraine.

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In the Sloboda Ukraine existed a lodge “Palitsynska Akademia”. The “Malorusian Secret Brotherhood” that was created by V.Lukashevych and sought the independence of Ukraine also was connected with freemasonry movement that continued to spread rapidly. In Kharkiv the most famous was the lodge “Umirayushchiy Sfinks” (Dying Sphinx) that was created sometime after 1764 when Kharkiv was visited by a Moscow University professor Viganda.

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In 1822 Aleksandr I issued an order prohibiting Freemasonry and it seemed that it will stop, however, the movement since then simply went underground.

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On September, 24th, 2005 in Paris, in the Grand Temple the Grand National Lodge of France (GNLF) together with the Grand Lodge of Austria consecrated the Grand Lodge of Ukraine (GLU).

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At present, 14 Lodges are operating under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Ukraine.

In Ukraine, Lodges work in the following cities: Kiev, Lviv, Odessa, Ivano-Frankivsk, Drohobych, Zaporizhia, Kharkiv and Chernivtsi.

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The Grand Lodge of Ukraine is recognized as a regular Grand Lodge by 133 regular Masonic Grand jurisdictions of the world.

The recent General Assembly of GLU 2021 took place on September 11 in Kyiv. There where an installation of the Grand Master of Ukraine elect Anatoliy Dymchuk. Official delegations from the Grand Lodges of Scotland, Bulgaria, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Poland, Belarus, Romania, Moldova and Tennessee (USA) attended the Assembly. During a ceremony, a Worshipful Lodge # 22 “Porta Pyretos” was consecrated in the east of Chernivtsi.

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the source/more: the official webpage of the Grand Lodge of Ukraine

 
 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

Click here to visit the Masonic Foundation of MB website

 

 

 

 
 

 

#DriversWanted call toll-free 1-888-939-3333

or need a ride to your cancer treatments.

 

 
 

 

Volunteer Drivers Wanted
“It hurt to know the important service we provide was suspended because I could imagine that many people would be facing hardships in getting to their cancer treatment.” 

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As a volunteer driver for our Wheels of Hope transportation service, Fraser has seen firsthand how valuable programs like these can be for Canadians affected by cancer. When he learned that the service had been put on hold during the pandemic, he switched his volunteer efforts to helping keep our communities safe. 

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Fraser created a revised training manual for Wheels of Hope drivers which included enhanced COVID-19 protocols and safety measures like sanitizing, masking and distancing within the vehicles. With the help of dedicated and compassionate volunteers like Fraser, we were able to safely resume Wheels of Hope in July 2021 and continue to be there for Canadians affected by cancer when they need it most.

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Learn more about our transportation services for Canadians affected by cancer: For More Info Click Here

 
 

 

 
 

 

 

 

Famous Freemason

 

Brother Joseph Roberts Smallwood

The last Father of Confederation in Canada

1900-1991

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Source: Canadian Encyclopedia

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     Joseph “Joey” Roberts Smallwood played an important role in bringing the province into Confederation in 1949. Smallwood served as Newfoundland and Labrador’s first Premier for nearly 23 years.

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     Smallwood was born 24 December 1900, at Mint Brook, near Gambo Nfld. His family moved to St. John’s. Here his education began in local schools, before his Uncle Fred helped him enroll as a boarder at Bishop Field College. He left the school at age 14, without completing his studies. He then apprenticed as a printer at the St. John’s ‘Plaindealer’, a local newspaper. Largely self-taught, Smallwood became well versed in the labour movement and social reform. While working as a typesetter, he gained experience as a journalist and even covered the first non-stop transatlantic flights in 1919.

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      Smallwood went on to live and work in New York for the better part of five years (he returned to Canada a number of times between 1920 and 1925). During that time, he held positions at left-wing dailies, ‘The New York Call’,  the ‘The New Leader’, as well as ‘The New York Times’. During the 1924 presidential election, Smallwood campaigned for the Socialist Party of America, which was affiliated with ‘The New York Call’. He was a self-proclaimed “socialist”. 

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     Returning to Newfoundland in 1925, he became a union organizer and radio broadcaster. He continued working in the newspaper industry, founding the ‘Labour Outlook’. After returning from a trip to England in 1926, he established himself in Corner Brook, Newfoundland, and founded the ‘Humber Herald’.

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     Smallwood planned to run as a Liberal candidate for Humber in 1928, but ceded the privilege to party leader Sir Richard Squires, and served as district campaign manager instead. He was rewarded for his work with an appointment as Justice of the Peace’. Smallwood was unsuccessful in his bid to represent Bonavista South in 1932.

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     During WWII, he ran a pig farm, at the air base in Gander, Nfld. His second opportunity to enter politics emerged in 1946 with the announcement of a National Convention. Britain’s new Labour government announced that Newfoundlanders, then governed as a protectorate by an appointed Commission of Government, could elect representatives who would advise the government on Newfoundland’s political future. Smallwood, who favoured Confederation with Canada, was elected to the Convention as a delegate for Bonavista Centre.

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     During the years of the National Convention (1946–47), Joey Smallwood established himself as the leading proponent of Confederation. He demonstrated willpower, courage and ruthlessness in the political ring, and mastered populist propaganda to make himself an exceptional contemporary politician. Smallwood believed that union with Canada would bring prosperity to Nfld. and improve Newfoundlanders’ quality of life by giving them access to North American standards of social welfare and public services. Smallwood dominated the National Convention debates, despite opposition from influential St. John’s merchants who accused him of betraying Newfoundland’s independence. In a memorable speech during the debates, he told Newfoundlanders the bitter truth: “We are not a nation. We are a medium-sized municipality […] left far behind in the march of time.”

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      Smallwood was a member of the first delegation sent to Ottawa in 1947 to discuss the potential terms of Newfoundland’s union with Canada. He was instrumental in having Confederation included on the ballot for the referendum that followed the National Convention. The referendum was to decide what form of government Newfoundland would pursue — to continue with the Commission of Government, a return to Responsible Government, or to join Confederation as Canada’s 10th province. 

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     Smallwood served as campaign manager for the Confederate Association, which formed in Feb. 1948. The Confederate Association officially launched its referendum campaign in April of that year, and its newspaper, ‘The Confederate’, was edited by Smallwood. Smallwood won the second of two hard-fought and close referenda on 22 July 1948 with the promise of increased social services, including employment insurance, family allowances (also known as the “baby bonus”), stronger pensions, and a lower cost of living. Following this success, Smallwood was included as a member of the delegation to negotiate Newfoundland’s final terms of union with Canada. He was appointed Premier of the interim government, elected leader of the Liberal Party and he won the first provincial election in May 1949. He was not seriously challenged as premier for two decades

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     As minister of economic development, Smallwood had a direct hand in the development and industrialisation efforts in NL.. He encouraged foreign investments to help build factories and spur the growth of new industries. Smallwood’s economic advisor and director of economic development, Alfred A. Valdmanis, helped facilitate investments from a number of German investors but nothing substantial materialized. Valdmanis was, however, taking kickbacks from the builders hired to build cement and gypsum plants. He was arrested and convicted of embezzlement in Sept. 1954.

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Smallwood also cultivated close relationships with industrial tycoons, including John C. Doyle (mining), and John Shaheen (oil). Smallwood facilitated Doyle’s acquisition of land and mining rights around Wabush Lake in Labrador and overlooked the shady financial dealings of his company Canadian Javelin. Shaheen’s proposal to build an oil refinery at Come by Chance, Newfoundland, resulted in one of largest bankruptcies in Canadian history.

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     In pursuit of a robust economy, Smallwood sought to develop the province’s natural resources. He became obsessed with the Churchill Falls hydro-electric power project, even though it proved a logistical nightmare to develop. The 1969 contract brought few economic benefits to the province. It tarnished Smallwood’s career.

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     The 1959 Badger Riot was another stain on Smallwood’s career and diminished his early credibility as an advocate for workers. The conflict originated when loggers asked the International Woodworkers of America (IWA) to replace the Newfoundland Loggers Association (NLA) as their representative. The latter, with the support of the logging company, opposed that decision. In 1959, Smallwood bolstered the company and the NLA by decertifying the IWA and creating legislation that nullified the collective bargaining rights of loggers and trade unions in general. In protest, the IWA led a strike to which the loggers added their grievances about low pay and poor working conditions. On 10 March 1959, tensions erupted and one member of the Newfoundland Constabulary was clubbed by a striker and later died. The International Labour Organization, Canadian Labour Congress and Prime Minister Diefenbaker (also a Mason), condemned Smallwood’s management of the situation.

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     Despite that, Smallwood and his Liberals are known for building schools, hospitals, and roads. To provide services to Newfoundlanders, however, residents in remote communities (known as outports) were resettled to “growth centres.” The experience produced a sense of deep dislocation among a generation of Newfoundlanders.

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      In 1964 Brother Smallwood was initiated, Passed, and raised in Lodge Northcliffe #1086 District GL of Scotland.

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After he initially announced his intention to retire in 1968, Smallwood had difficulty letting go of his political career and changed his mind a few times. He survived a challenge from disaffected Cabinet Minister John Crosbie at the 1969 Liberal leadership convention. But in the October 1971 election, the Conservatives led by Frank Moores won 21 seats, Smallwood 20 seats, and the New Labrador Party 1 seat. Smallwood resigned as leader Jan. 1972, and vacated his seat soon after. He tried unsuccessfully to win back the Liberal leadership in 1974. He formed the Liberal Reform Party, which won 4 seats in the 1975 election. In 1977, he rejoined the Liberals but relinquished his seat and exited politics in June of the same year.

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In retirement, he returned to writing, most notably his ‘Encyclopedia of Newfoundland and Labrador’ (volume 1, 1981; volume 2, 1984). Three remaining volumes were published posthumously. In December 1986, Smallwood was made a Companion of the Order of Canada. 

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     Joey Smallwood died 17 December 1991 in St. John’s, Newfoundland, just a few days before he would have turned 91.

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Thought for the Day

True teachers are those who help us think for ourselves

 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

www.blood.ca

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

Articles published in this newsletter are not necessarily the opinion of the Grand Lodge of Manitoba or any of its officers or members, but are solely those of the writer…

Freemasonry is the world’s oldest and largest fraternity. It is comprised of adult men (18+) of good character from every country, religion, race, age, income, education, and opinion. Its body of knowledge and system of ethics is based on the belief that each man has a responsibility to improve himself while being devoted to his family, his faith, his country, and his fraternity.

 

Submissions welcome, please submit your Lodge events, photos, & etc.

to the email address provided below. 

 Grand Lodge of Manitoba |  204.453.7410 | reception@grandlodge.mb.ca

www.glmb.ca